Osteoarthritis Treatment Choctaw OK

Here are some information on Osteoarthritis including differences between primary osteoarthritis and secondary osteoarthritis plus osteoarthritis treatment and symptoms. Read on to learn more information.

Raul Jose A Romea, MD
(405) 737-6600
2801 Parklawn Dr Fl 5
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of The Philippines, Coll Of Med, Manila, Philippines
Graduation Year: 1992
Hospital
Hospital: St Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City, Ok
Group Practice: Orthopaedic & Reconstructive

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Ewa Olech
(405) 271-7805
825 Ne 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Ira N Targoff, MD
(405) 271-6655
825 NE 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ, Bronx Ny 10461
Graduation Year: 1975

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Amr H Sawalha
(405) 271-8478
825 Ne 10th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Leslie S Staudt
(405) 271-8478
825 Ne 10th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Ira Targoff
(405) 271-8478
825 Northeast 10th Street #4300
Oklahoma City, OK
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ
Year of Graduation: 1975
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Lama Abdulkader Hashish, MD
(405) 270-5122
921 NE 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Damascus, Fac Of Med, Damascus, Syria
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided by:
Morris Reichlin, MD
(405) 271-6655
825 NE 13th St # C308
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1959
Hospital
Hospital: University Hospital, Oklahoma City, Ok
Group Practice: Department Of Medicine Univ Of Ok Health Sciences Ctr; Ou Physicians

Data Provided by:
Leslie Staudt, MD
(405) 271-6655
825 NE 10th St # OUPB4300
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: U Of Tx Med Sch At Houston, Houston Tx 77225
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided by:
James N Jarvis
(405) 271-7086
940 Ne 13th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Rheumatology

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Exercising with Osteoarthritis

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Osteoarthritis

Exercising with osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease in which the cartilage starts to break down in the joints. The main function of cartilage is to maintain a frictionless surface and provide cushioning between bones. Thus, cartilage breakdown causes friction to develop between the bones of the joint, leading to inflammation, pain and decreased mobility.

Osteoarthritis is divided into two categories – primary and secondary. The two categories have the same symptoms, but differ in their origins:

  • Primary osteoarthritis has no specific cause and is often related to aging. As people get older, the water content of their cartilage increases while the protein content decreases. Over time, repetitive use of the joints can irritate the aged cartilage and lead to inflamed cartilage and pain. Eventually, the cartilage might start to flake off or form crevasses in its surface. The uneven surface that develops causes increased friction and more pain, as well as a decrease in joint mobility.
  • Secondary osteoarthritis will exhibit the same symptoms as mentioned above, but is a result of another disease or condition, such as obesity, trauma to the joint, congenital abnormalities, diabetes, gout or hormonal disorders.

The joints most commonly afflicted by osteoarthritis are the hands, feet, knees, hips and spine. Men and women are both affected by this disease, but it’s been recorded that under the age of 45, more men are affected than women, while over the age of 55, more women are affected than men.

Treatment

A number of people afflicted by osteoarthritis experience very little symptoms and do not require much treatment, while some individuals are affected severely and require one or more types of treatment to alleviate the symptoms. Rest, exercise, weight reduction (especially effective when weight-bearing joints are affected), physical and occupational therapy, and weight support devices ease the symptoms in some patients.

Other patients also require medication to reduce pain and increase mobility. Drugs such as aspirin, acetaminophen, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and cortisone are commonly recommended by the doctor and have proven effective for certain people. Research is still being done to determine the effectiveness of glucosamine supplementation.

If the condition becomes severe and the cartilage in the affected joints has disappeared altogether, patients need to undergo more drastic treatment. At this point, a knee scope or total joint replacement might be recommended.

Is exercise beneficial to osteoarthritis sufferers?

Exercise has a positive effect on arthritic individuals, since it does not aggravate the affected joint as long as it is performed at a level of intensity that does not cause pain. Exercise helps to enhance the strength of muscles surrounding the joints and increase cardiovascular fitness. It also helps to maintain or increase flexibility and...

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