Osteoarthritis Treatment Edgewood MD

Here are some information on Osteoarthritis including differences between primary osteoarthritis and secondary osteoarthritis plus osteoarthritis treatment and symptoms. Read on to learn more information.

Ashu Paul Mehta, MD
(847) 723-5878
9110 Georgia Belle Dr
Perry Hall, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ross Univ, Sch Of Med & Vet Med, Roseau, Dominica
Graduation Year: 1997

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Andrea S Marx, MD
(410) 494-1888
1220B E Joppa Rd Ste 310
Towson, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1988

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Howard W Hauptman
(410) 494-1888
1220b E Joppa Rd
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

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Mala Mehta, MD
(703) 471-6550
5601 Loch Raven Blvd
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided by:
Thomas Michael Zizic, MD
(410) 532-4007
5601 Loch Raven Blvd
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided by:
Tariq Mahmood, MD
201 Back River Neck Rd Ste 109
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: King Edward Med Coll, Univ Of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided by:
Lynn M Ludmer
(410) 494-1888
1220b E Joppa Rd
Baltimore, MD
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided by:
Dr.Howard Hauptman
(410) 494-1888
1220 E Joppa Rd # B-310
Towson, MD
Gender
M
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.2, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided by:
Jill Stacie Ratain, MD
(410) 532-4646
5601 Loch Raven Blvd
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Yale Univ Sch Of Med, New Haven Ct 06510
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided by:
Peter Anthony Holt, MD
(410) 532-4840
5601 Loch Raven Blvd
Baltimore, MD
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1978

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Exercising with Osteoarthritis

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Osteoarthritis

Exercising with osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease in which the cartilage starts to break down in the joints. The main function of cartilage is to maintain a frictionless surface and provide cushioning between bones. Thus, cartilage breakdown causes friction to develop between the bones of the joint, leading to inflammation, pain and decreased mobility.

Osteoarthritis is divided into two categories – primary and secondary. The two categories have the same symptoms, but differ in their origins:

  • Primary osteoarthritis has no specific cause and is often related to aging. As people get older, the water content of their cartilage increases while the protein content decreases. Over time, repetitive use of the joints can irritate the aged cartilage and lead to inflamed cartilage and pain. Eventually, the cartilage might start to flake off or form crevasses in its surface. The uneven surface that develops causes increased friction and more pain, as well as a decrease in joint mobility.
  • Secondary osteoarthritis will exhibit the same symptoms as mentioned above, but is a result of another disease or condition, such as obesity, trauma to the joint, congenital abnormalities, diabetes, gout or hormonal disorders.

The joints most commonly afflicted by osteoarthritis are the hands, feet, knees, hips and spine. Men and women are both affected by this disease, but it’s been recorded that under the age of 45, more men are affected than women, while over the age of 55, more women are affected than men.

Treatment

A number of people afflicted by osteoarthritis experience very little symptoms and do not require much treatment, while some individuals are affected severely and require one or more types of treatment to alleviate the symptoms. Rest, exercise, weight reduction (especially effective when weight-bearing joints are affected), physical and occupational therapy, and weight support devices ease the symptoms in some patients.

Other patients also require medication to reduce pain and increase mobility. Drugs such as aspirin, acetaminophen, NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and cortisone are commonly recommended by the doctor and have proven effective for certain people. Research is still being done to determine the effectiveness of glucosamine supplementation.

If the condition becomes severe and the cartilage in the affected joints has disappeared altogether, patients need to undergo more drastic treatment. At this point, a knee scope or total joint replacement might be recommended.

Is exercise beneficial to osteoarthritis sufferers?

Exercise has a positive effect on arthritic individuals, since it does not aggravate the affected joint as long as it is performed at a level of intensity that does not cause pain. Exercise helps to enhance the strength of muscles surrounding the joints and increase cardiovascular fitness. It also helps to maintain or increase flexibility and...

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