Rowing Great Falls MT

Information and tips on rowing including how to use rowing machines, where to find used rowing machines and common injuries associated with this type of fitness gear.

Meadow Lark Country Club
(406) 454-3553
300 Country Club Blvd
Great Falls, MT
 
Zahara Valley Golf Club
(406) 453-4471
240 Sunflower Ln
Great Falls, MT
 
Montana River Outfitters
(406) 761-1677
923 10th Ave N
Great Falls, MT
 
Skiers Edge Pro Shop
(406) 727-3955
1510 9th St S
Great Falls, MT
 
Champs
(406) 771-7177
1200 10th Ave S Ste 11
Great Falls, MT
 
Diamondback Golf
(406) 727-8613
1714 3rd St NW
Great Falls, MT
 
Big Bear Sport Center
(406) 761-6400
121 Northwest Byp
Great Falls, MT
 
Scheels
(406) 453-7666
Great Falls, MT
 
Swat
(406) 771-7928
1812 10th Ave S
Great Falls, MT
 
Wolverton's Fly Shop
(406) 454-0254
210 5th St S
Great Falls, MT
 

Rowing

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Rowing

A great exercise

Want a great workout for your butt and thighs, as well as your core and upper body? Give rowing a try! This activity can be performed in a sleek scull in which you glide across the water or in the air-conditioned comfort of your home or gym. A major misconception of rowing is the idea that it only works the upper body. Nothing could be further from the truth. Once you step off of the rowing erg or climb out of the scull, your thighs and butt will definitely be screaming more than your arms. Your arms to get a good workout too, but most of the power of the stroke comes from your lower body.

Why is rowing so great?

First of all, there is zero impact on your knees and back and less likelihood of becoming injured. Also, you can do this sport with a team (pairs, fours, six, etc.) or you can do it individually (single or on the erg at the gym). Don’t worry, rowing with a team doesn’t mean you get less of a workout, it just means that you will go faster and will have to put more focus on your timing.

How do I get involved?

Look for a rowing club in your area. That would be an excellent way to introduce yourself to the sport, as they would have coaches, boats and other beginners too. Just be prepared to get up early for practice because most rowing teams practice as soon as the sun comes up, when the water is calmest.

The Repetitiveness of Rowing

Although rowing is a low-impact sport, the potential for developing an injury is still there because rowing is so repetitive. In addition, rowing is performed with an unsupported posture. Repetitive activity in an unsupported posture over a prolonged period of time puts a good deal of stress on the body (i.e., joints and muscles). The abnormal body positioning required for rowing strains the muscles and tendons, could lead to muscle imbalances and eventually cause pain in the joints.

What are the most common injuries experienced by rowers?

  • Lower back pain is caused by repeatedly bending forward and backward.
  • Upper back pain is experienced in the neck, shoulders and upper back.
  • Wrist. Pain in wrists could lead to wrist tendonitis.
  • Rib stress fractures. These are usually only a concern for elite rowers, as they spend hours rowing every day. Stress fracture occurs as a result of the serratus anterior muscle pulling on the ribs.
  • Blisters are very common for beginners, who have not yet built up calluses on their hands.

What can I do to prevent a rowing injury?

  1. Maintain overall health and fitness. Eating properly and staying active will help to keep you injury-free. I would suggest regular cardio activity in addition to strength-training, as both will help to improve your overall strength and stamina, leading to better technique and less chance of injury.
  2. Incorporate a good core / abdominal program into your workouts. Lower back injury is the most common grievance of rowers and can be easily prevented with strong core muscles (e.g., ab...

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