Diet Counseling Ansonia CT

The Food Pyramid was developed by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a way to help people understand how to eat healthy. If you're having trouble understanding the proper nutrients and serving sizes needed in your daily diet, print off a copy of the Food Pyramid and place it on your fridge.

Norma Camacho D.C. & Daniel Tarifi D.C.
(203) 248-7200
3281 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT
Business
Hamden Chiropractic Health and Spine Center L
Specialties
Chiropractic, Auto Accident Care, Workers Comp, Slip and Fall, Family Care, Nutrition, and Muscle Theraphy
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Most Plans Accepted
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Medical School: Life University , 01
Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided by:
University of Bridgeport
(203) 576-4552
126 Park Ave.
Bridgeport, CT
Specialty
Acupressure, Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Chiropractors, Colon Therapy, Herbology, Homeopathy, Integrative Medicine, Kinesiology, Massage Therapy, Naturopathy, Nutrition, Physical / Exercise Therapy, Reflexology, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Water Therapy
Associated Hospitals
Naturopathic Medical Center

Douglas A Rofrano, MD
(203) 574-3655
279 Oakville Ave Apt A22
Waterbury, CT
Specialties
Family Practice, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Languages
Italian, Spanish
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1951

Data Provided by:
Ddd Nutrition Svc
(203) 795-6746
391 Old Silo Rd
Orange, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

First Care
(203) 389-6188
1700 Dixwell Ave,# 1
Hamden, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Martin Herbert Floch, MD
(203) 737-6061
PO Box 208019
New Haven, CT
Specialties
Gastroenterology, Nutrition
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1956
Hospital
Hospital: Norwalk Hosp, Norwalk, Ct
Group Practice: Norwalk Hospital

Data Provided by:
Stanley John Dudrick, MD
(203) 709-6314
56 Franklin St
Waterbury, CT
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1961
Hospital
Hospital: Bridgeport Hosp, Bridgeport, Ct; St Marys Hosp, Waterbury, Ct

Data Provided by:
Michelle Ingels
(203) 254-9957
2425 Post Road
Southport, CT
Company
New England Family Health Associates
Industry
Acupuncturist, Herbalist, Nutritionist
Specialties & Therapies
Specialties : Women's Health

Therapies : Family Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, Prenatal Care

Data Provided by:
Jenny Craig
(203) 799-3714
108 Boston Post Rd
Orange, CT
Alternate Phone Number
(203) 799-3714
Services
Weight Loss, Diet Plans

Jenn Kewbs
(203) 776-1212
26 Trumbull St
New Haven, CT
Hours
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday: Closed

Data Provided by:

The Food Pyramid

Provided By: 

The Food Pyramid

The Food Pyramid was developed by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), as a way to help people understand how to eat healthy. If you're having trouble understanding the proper nutrients and serving sizes needed in your daily diet, print off a copy of the Food Pyramid and place it on your fridge.

Food pyramid (from bottom to top) includes:

Grains are products rich in fiber, vitamin B and minerals. Any food made from rice, wheat, oats, cornmeal, barley or cereal gain is considered a grain product. Grains are divided into 2 categories whole grains and refined grains. The USDA recommends a minimum of 3-ounces of whole grain products daily. Good sources of whole grain exist in 1 slice of 100-percent whole wheat bread or a ½ cup of whole wheat pasta, brown rice, oatmeal or whole grain cereals.

Vegetables are naturally low in fat and calories. Both vegetable and 100-percent vegetable juice contain a high concentration of potassium, dietary fiber, folic acid and vitamin A, C and E. Vegetables belong to one of five subgroups dark green leafy vegetables (bok choy, broccoli, spinach and dark green lettuce), orange vegetables (carrots, pumpkin and sweet potatoes), dry beans and peas (black beans, kidney beans, soy beans, split peas, tofu, etc.), starchy vegetables (corn, green peas and white potatoes) and others (cauliflower, celery, eggplant, mushrooms, onions, tomatoes and zucchini). A minimum of 2-cups of vegetables are required in an adult daily diet.

Fruits are Mother Nature's low-fat, low-sodium and low-calorie dessert. Consuming a variety of fruits each day provides a diet high in vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium and folic acid. Eating or drink the equivalent of 2 cups of fruits per day is suggested for adults by the USDA.

Dairy this category includes any foods made from milk, such as cow's milk, yogurt, cheeses and cottage cheese. They're enriched with calcium, potassium, protein and vitamin D. However, keep in mind that this group contains some extremely high-fat foods such as butter, whole milk and ice cream. It's recommended that adults stick to sources of fat-free and low-fat dairy such as skim milk, fat-free yogurt and fat-free cottage cheese.

Meat and Beans include any meat proteins (pork and beef), poultry (chicken, duck, turkey and goose), fish, eggs, beans, peas, nuts and seeds. These are high in protein, vitamins B and E, and minerals like iron, zinc and magnesium. Experiment with different meats at every meal to get balanced nutrients. A 6-ounce portion is the daily recommendation.

Fats include liquid fats and solid fats. Liquid fats include oils such as cooking oils, fish oils and oils exacted from plants. Solid fats are commonly found in butter, margarine, shortening and lard or beef tallow. Oils such as flaxseed and olive oil contain essential fatty acids (or EFAs), which the body can't synthesize, but needs for normal metabolism. A daily allowance of 6-teaspoons of ...

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